Song Performed by Joni Eareckson Tada for “Alone Yet Not Alone” Christian Movie Gets Surprise Oscar Nomination

Joni Eareckson Tada leads the opening prayer on the opening night of the Greater Los Angeles Billy Graham Crusade on Nov. 18, 2004 in Pasadena, Calif. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

Joni Eareckson Tada leads the opening prayer on the opening night of the Greater Los Angeles Billy Graham Crusade on Nov. 18, 2004 in Pasadena, Calif. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

One of the categories that had us scratching our heads the most following Thursday’s Oscar nominations had nothing to do with Tom Hanks’ and Emma Thompson’s unjust snubs. It was Best Original Song that saw a slew of A-list frontrunners shut out in favor of a movie we’re fairly certain no one has heard of: “Alone Yet Not Alone.”

The movie’s nominated song goes by the same title and was written by Bruce Broughton and Dennis Spiegel. It topped Taylor Swift’s “Sweeter than Fiction” (“One Chance”), Coldplay’s “Atlas” (“The Hunger Games: Catching Fire”), Lana Del Rey’s “Young and Beautiful” (“The Great Gatsby”), Beyonce’s “Rise Up” (“Epic”), Ed Sheeran’s “I See Fire” (“The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug”), Jay Z’s “100$ Bill” (“The Great Gatsby”) and Fantasia Barrino’s “In The Middle of the Night” (“Lee Daniels’ The Butler”).

“Alone Yet Not Alone,” performed by evangelical Christian author and singer Joni Eareckson Tada, is the category’s only nominee not featured in an animated movie or sung by a well-known recording artist. The other nominees are Yeah Yeah Yeahs frontwoman Karen O’s “The Moon Song” (“Her”), Pharrell Williams’ “Happy” (“Despicable Me 2″), U2′s “Ordinary Love” (“Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom”) and the “Frozen” anthem “Let It Go.”

“Alone Not Yet Alone” saw a limited release last year — but not one that was big enough for it to merit an entry on Box Office Mojo, which tracks movies’ ticket-sale revenues, or any reviews on Rotten Tomatoes. The film’s Facebook page indicates it will receive a nationwide opening this March. A Christian-themed historical drama set in 1755 against the backdrop of the French and Indian War, the film centers on two sisters who are taken captive during the war and subsequently separated, which leaves them clinging to their faith in search of survival. The title refers to the family hymn they sing to remain hopeful.

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SOURCE: The Huffington Post
Matthew Jacobs