Let's Rethink Our Holly-Jolly Christmas Songs

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Sometimes I learn a lot from conversations I was never intended to hear. This happened the other day as I was stopping by my local community bookstore. It's a small store, and a quiet store so it was impossible not to eavesdrop as I heard a young man tell his friend how much he hated Christmas. And, you know what, the more he talked, the more I understood his point.

This man wasn't talking about the hustle and bustle of the holidays, or about the stresses of family meals or all the things people tend to complain about. What he hated was the music.

This guy started by lampooning Sting's Christmas album, and I found myself smiling as I browsed because he is so right; it's awful. But then he went on to say that he hated Christmas music across the board. That's when I started to feel as though I might be in the presence of the Grinch. You know, when every Who down in Who-ville, the tall and the small, would stand close together, with Christmas bells ringing; they'd stand hand-in-hand. And the Who's would start singing. The sour old green villain didn't like that.

But then this man explained why he found the music so bad. It wasn't just that it was cloying. It's that it was boring.

"Christmas is boring because there's no narrative tension," he said. "It's like reading a book with no conflict."

Now he had my attention.

I'm sure this man had thought this for a long time, but maybe he felt freer to say it because we were only hours out from hearing the horrifying news of a massacre of innocent children in Connecticut. For him, the tranquil lyrics of our Christmas songs couldn't encompass such terror. Maybe we should think about that.

Of course, some of the blame is on our sentimentalized Christmas of the American civil religion. Simeon the prophet never wished anyone a "holly-jolly Christmas" or envisioned anything about chestnuts roasting on an open fire. But there's our songs too, the songs of the church. We ought to make sure that what we sing measures up with the, as this fellow would put it, "narrative tension" of the Christmas story.

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SOURCE: Crosswalk
Russell Moore
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