Eating Lunch Late May Mean Less Weight Loss

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People who like to eat lunch late in the afternoon may have more trouble shedding pounds than those who dine earlier, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that of 420 people in a weight-loss program, the late-lunch crowd lost about 25 percent less weight than those who usually lunched before 3 p.m.

The findings, reported Jan. 29 in the International Journal of Obesity, come with caveats. The researchers cannot be sure that a late lunch itself thwarts people's diets. And the study participants were from Spain, where lunch is the biggest meal of the day.

It's not clear if the findings would translate to a country like the United States, where most people eat a lighter lunch and save their main meal for dinner, said senior researcher Frank Scheer, an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston.

It is a common belief that it's better to have your big meal earlier in the day. Scheer pointed to the popular advice to eat breakfast like a king and dinner like a pauper. But there hasn't been much scientific evidence that the timing of your main meal matters in the battle of the bulge.

"This is the first large-scale, long-term study to show that it is an important factor in weight-loss success for overweight and obese individuals," Scheer said.

It's uncertain why a late lunch would be related to slower weight loss. One possibility, though, is that at least some late lunchers were going too long between meals, which might have effects on metabolism.

Some studies have suggested that evenly spaced meals -- eating every three to four hours -- are helpful in weight control, noted Connie Diekman, director of university nutrition at Washington University in St. Louis.

In this study, the late-lunch group was more likely to eat a light breakfast or skip breakfast altogether. Almost 7 percent of later lunchers did so, versus less than 3 percent of people who ate lunch earlier.

So the findings show a "potential connection between going too long between meals and weight gain," said Diekman, who was not involved in the study. "But given the study design, more studies are needed to determine if there is a cause-and-effect connection."

The problem is that people who hold off on lunch may differ from other dieters in many ways -- including ways that could hinder their weight loss.

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SOURCE: HealthDay News
Amy Norton
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