Black History Month: Celebrating Civil Rights Leader and Pro-Lifer Fannie Lou Hamer

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Black History Month should be a time of celebration of achievement as well as an honest reflection on the impediments to freedom for all. As we look at those whose lives changed history, it's quite evident that these champions for freedom have predominantly risen from the most impoverished and seemingly impossible situations. Civil rights leader Fannie Lou Hamer is one of many who broke through the generational shackles of poverty to live a life devoted to helping free others from the same bondage.

Fannie Lou (Townshend) Hamer was born into poverty in 1917 (the youngest of 20 children), which according to Planned Parenthood's philosophy, was a circumstance worthy of eliminating her.  (We expose this warped ideology in our TooManyAborted.com campaigns.) Since the age of 6, she worked in the cotton fields with her sharecropping family and was forced to leave school at the age of 12.

But Fannie Lou Hamer defied the disproven narrative that poverty cannot birth greatness. She and her husband, Perry "Pap" Hamer, tirelessly toiled on a Mississippi plantation. Slavery just in a legally different form, he worked in the fields while she, armed with the ability to read and write, worked in the big House. In 1962, her life took an even more drastic turn.

She was diagnosed with a small uterine tumor, but instead of simply removing it, the doctor performed a hysterectomy without her consent. Pro-abortion activists often refer to Hamer's ordeal as "Mississippi Appendectomies" a term Hamer coined. These unjust acts were done to thousands of black women across the country, like North Carolinian Elaine Riddick. But abortion activists don't mention those sterilizations were heavily pushed, and performed by, Planned Parenthood, or that Fannie Lou Hamer was passionately pro-life. This traumatic experience was the catalyst for her social activism, to fight the incredible injustice that black Americans faced, daily, in America.

She fought for the right of black Americans to vote, risking her very life as she survived violent attacks for her public crusade for rights guaranteed by the Constitution. She never gave up. Hamer wanted to provide a better world for black children who were constantly the target of racist efforts that pushed birth control and other eugenic social policies masquerading as anti-poverty measures. In fact, Hamer was quoted as saying, during a White House Conference on Food, Nutrition, and Health: "I didn't come to talk about birth control. I came here to get some food to feed poor, hungry people. Where are they carrying on that kind of talk?"

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SOURCE: LifeNews
Ryan Bomberger
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