Why It Is Harder for Black People to Come Out as Atheists More Than Any Other Race of People

When Clive Aruede's twelve-year-old daughter asked him "What is science?" he couldn't have known quite how much it would change his life. But when I meet him in a gloomy bar in Borough, Clive pinpoints this innocent question as the beginning of a long and arduous journey towards atheism.'

Leo Igwe at Hackney Attic. Photograph: London Black Atheists
The phrase he uses is that he "came out", which implies that he had been hiding 'in the closet' - that he felt the beliefs or lifestyle of an atheist would be seen as objectionable to wider society. But being an atheist in the UK is hardly controversial. In the 2011 Census around 14 million people - a quarter of the UK's population - claimed to have 'no religion'. But for Clive this didn't matter, because Clive is black.

According to figures from Christian Research in their 2005 English Church Census, black people are much more likely to be religious than most other demographic groups. The census showed that though black people only made up around 2 per cent of the population at the time, they nonetheless accounted for 7 per cent of churchgoers nationwide, and 44 per cent of churchgoers in London. In fact, at the time his daughter asked him about science, Clive was included in these figures because he, too, was a practicing Christian - a Eucharistic Minister, no less.

Lola Tinubu also fell into this demographic, though she had already been questioning God and religion since she was young. "It started with the tribal culture," she tells me. "I asked my father about his relationship with my mother because I didn't understand the inequality, and he said 'That's what God wants', so that bothered me." But despite her growing doubts throughout her teenage years, she went along with the tide of belief. When she came from Nigeria to the UK, she even joined an Evangelical church and preached in public. She laughs about this, and supposes she did it mostly because she needed to feel a part of a community.

For both Clive and Lola, like many millions of other black people, belief in God was never a matter of choice - it was just a fact, like the sun or the sky. The Bible held all the answers to any question they could possibly ask, and church formed the backbone of their social life. They grew up attending church every Sunday - filling the rest of their time with Bible studies and prayer meetings. Neither ever had the space to ask why.

For Clive though, the moment came when his daughter asked him about science. As he researched a response for her, he discovered a world of fascinating information he hadn't known about before, which began to make him wonder if the Bible really did have all the answers. He was determined to find out more, so he read up on science regularly, and the tensions between what he was learning and the received wisdom of religion only got more strained.

Eventually he felt he had to make a choice. He could either continue believing in the supernatural power of God or instead embrace all he had been reading, and accept that science, not God, is responsible for the natural world. It was an extremely difficult process, but he settled on accepting atheism. For someone of Clive's background, the social ramifications of such a decision are huge, but as a part of his "coming out", he sent an e-mail to all his contacts, designed to explain himself. He was immediately inundated with outraged messages and attempts to prove he was wrong. Two people even flew over from Nigeria to talk with him in person.

For Lola, the final straw for God and religion came when her religious father visited from Nigeria. It turned out he enjoyed watching popular science TV shows. "That's the irony of it!" says Lola. "He loves science!" But when he saw how genuinely interested in science she was, he told her "Facts are not the same as truth." Lola realised that this absurd statement was "cognitive dissonance - he couldn't reconcile his own beliefs with the facts."

That was it. First she began asking difficult questions in Bible study. Then she stopped going to church altogether. She also stopped going to other social functions where prayer would form an inevitable part of the program. Her friends would often call, asking where she was, imploring her to come to the next event. But she couldn't. Her self-imposed absence from a primary social hub of Nigerian culture - church - left her with no friends or social life, and this warm, vivacious woman ended up spending a year in treatment for clinical depression. It is often "a very long journey" for black people to become atheists, she says.

It was the same for Clive: "It's been a very uncomfortable experience." As far as his friends and family were concerned, "It was like claiming I was a demon or a devil." He says it is still causing problems within his family, and this shows how difficult it is to become an atheist from a background where religion is everything. He stresses that for many black people, "Religion is woven into the whole texture of your life. It's everything. It's reality...part of your identity." 


Source: New Statesman | LIAM MCLAUGHLIN 
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