Pro-Life Oakland, CA Pastor Walter Hoye says 'the Pro-Life Movement Ignores the Black Community at Its Peril'

If the pro-life movement is serious about ending abortion in America, it has no option but to start making a deliberate effort to reach out to the black and other minority communities, a prominent black pro-life pastor and his wife told a meeting of pro-life leaders in San Francisco last month.
"Why does black America say 'no' to the pro-life movement?" Walter Hoye asked. "The pro-life community has not asked us 'Why?' You have no idea why we're saying no." 

Hoye is a pastor in Oakland who was famously so effective at sidewalk counseling outside a local abortion clinic, that the city passed an ordinance to stop his life-saving efforts - an ordinance he has repeatedly flouted, earning himself jail time in the process.

"The strategies that work in my community are different than maybe what will work in the larger pro-life community," he told the gathered pro-life leaders. "There's gotta be room at the table to talk about executing strategies that can start a conversation in the communities that are being targeted and are being slaughtered."

'A holocaust in our community'

Hoye's wife, Lori, a trained statistician, pointed to the sobering statistics showing how disproportionately high the abortion rate in the black community is compared to the national average. 

"Abortion is the number one cause of death in the African American community," she said. "We lose over half a million lives in our community to abortion every year. If you combine cancer, heart disease, AIDS, diabetes, and any kind of violent crime, add them all up together, they don't come even close to the lives we lose to abortion." 

"It's a holocaust in our community," she said. 

The latest abortion numbers from the CDC, released just days ago, have only served to emphasize her point, showing that while the abortion rate among whites fell between 2007 and 2010, the rate jumped three percent among blacks, and eight percent for Hispanics. 

During those three years nearly 36 percent of all abortions in the U.S. were performed on black children, even though blacks make up only 12.8 percent of the population. Another 21 percent of abortions were performed on Hispanics, and an additional seven percent on other minority races. 

'The brothers are blood guilty'

But the challenges facing a largely white pro-life movement in stemming the tide of abortion among blacks and other minorities are daunting, said Walter Hoye, who outlined four reasons why leaders in the black community, particularly the pastors, are unwilling to speak up about abortion. 

Probably the most insidious and difficult to overcome, he said, is that most black pastors are post-abortion. 

"The brothers are blood guilty," he said. "There's an abortion in their life somewhere. It's their mama, it's their wife, it may be their son, it may be their daughter. It may be a member of their congregation who they wrote the check for, or even drove to the clinic." 

Even though they may understand the Biblical arguments against abortion, when Planned Parenthood comes into their community and tells them that the unborn baby isn't a child but a "choice," a black pastor "embraces all that because it allows him to sleep at night," Walter said. "He needs to be healed." 

But the need for healing presents its own challenges, added Lori, who pointed to the lack of any resources in the black community to provide such healing. It's also a catch-22, she added, because even when some black pastors have attempted to bring post-abortion healing ministries into their churches, few, if any, women have shown up.


Source: Life Site News | JOHN JALSEVAC

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